Fortnightly Yours. 7/24 2024

Click on the first letter to navigate to the sections

Arresting  |  Factual  |  General  |  Seminal  |  Wacky

Arresting : striking, eye-catching

Select news from Reuters and Japan times.

A1. Iran ruffled again.

A2. South China sea developments.

A3. Fight back or flee? Myanmar draft forces hard choices on youth.

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A1. Iran ruffled again.

Iran faces a dilemma following an Israeli attack on its embassy in Syria: how to retaliate without sparking a wider conflict that Middle East analysts said Tehran doesn’t appear to want. In hindsight we know that they retaliated and as opposed to the reports in most media who says the response was lukewarm, some prominent personalities like the British MP George Galloway, as might be expected of him, in the company of some experts are arguing for the contrary.

Many Iranian options to retaliate against Israel, but all carry risk | Reuters

A2. South China sea developments.

Japan joined the United States, Australia, and the Philippines for joint naval and air drills in the disputed South China Sea on Sunday, as China announced its own exercises in the strategic waterway.

Philippines, U.S., Australia and Japan hold joint military drills in disputed South China Sea – The Japan Times

A3. Fight back or flee? Myanmar draft forces hard choices on youth.

 

Enforcing a 2010 law, the junta said in February all men aged 18 to 35 and women 18 to 27 must serve for up to two years, while specialists like doctors aged up to 45 must serve for three years. That means 14 million people, 27% of Myanmar’s population, are subject to conscription, the junta says, calling on around 60,000 a year to enlist. Estimates of the current size of the armed forces, rebel groups or numbers of people trying to avoid conscription could not be ascertained.

Fight back or flee? Myanmar draft forces hard choices on youth | Reuters

Factual : actually occurring.

Click on the first letter to navigate to the sections

Arresting  |  Factual  |  General  |  Seminal  |  Wacky

Select news from Reuters, Japan times and Investopaedia.

F1. Index funds in the news.

F2. Hunger grips southern Africa as Zimbabwe declares drought a disaster.

F3. Palestine leadership.

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F1. Index funds in the news.

 

A member of the U.S. Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) called for scrutiny of top asset managers’ ownership of power utilities, as the oversight body began a review. Critics have voiced concern about the growing share of corporate stocks held by passive investors, although FERC in May extended an authorization for big index funds to own utility shares.

US regulator looks at power utility ownership by top asset managers | Reuters

https://www.investopedia.com/terms/i/indexfund.as

F2. Hunger grips southern Africa as Zimbabwe declares drought a disaster.

 

Humanitarian agencies including the World Food Programme, which fed 270,000 people between January and March in four districts, have described the hunger situation as “dire”, calling on donors to provide more aid. The drought in southern Africa has reached crisis levels with Botswana and Angola to the west, and Mozambique and Madagascar to the east also facing hunger.

Hunger grips southern Africa as Zimbabwe declares drought a disaster | Reuters

F3. Palestine leadership.

A new Palestinian government that includes both Gazans and four women was sworn in Sunday but is already facing skepticism from its own people. The Palestinian Authority led by Mahmoud Abbas is under pressure from Washington to prepare to step into the breach in the aftermath of the Gaza war and undertake reforms.

New leadership for Palestinian Authority gets lukewarm reception – The Japan Times

G1. General Electric dismantling.

The dismantling of GE, once America’s iconic ‘everything company,’ is now complete. GE once did almost everything for the typical American family – from providing much of the television they watched, to the light bulbs and appliances they depended upon, the electricity needed to power those household staples, even the subprime mortgage that allowed many of them to buy their homes. No longer.

General Electric, once America’s iconic everything company, has completed its dismantling. Here’s what that means | CNN Business

G2. Trump proof NATO funding.

NATO to plan long-term Ukraine aid, mulls 100-billion euro fund. NATO allies agreed on Wednesday to initiate planning on long-term military support for Ukraine, but a proposal by NATO Secretary General Jens Stoltenberg to do so via a 100 billion-euro ($107 billion) five-year fund drew mixed responses.

NATO to plan long-term Ukraine aid, mulls 100-billion euro fund | Reuters

G3. Argentina builds case for exporting natgas to Brazil through Bolivia.

Energy companies from Argentina and Brazil have begun talks on reversing the southerly flow of a Bolivian natural gas pipeline network that connects the three countries as a regional gas deficit could force Brazil to pay up for alternative supplies of the fuel.

Argentina builds case for exporting natgas to Brazil through Bolivia | Reuters

Seminal : original ,groundbreaking

Click on the first letter to navigate to the sections

Arresting |  Factual  |  General  |  Seminal  |  Wacky

Select news from Reuters and Japan times.

S1. Yayoi Kusama was the world’s top-selling artist last year.

S2. Bullet train interests in the USA.

S3. Can we trust the polls? How emerging technologies affect democracy.

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S1. Yayoi Kusama was the world’s top-selling artist last year.

Yayoi Kusama may have her detractors, but the purveyor of polka dots has proved yet again that she’s a commercial powerhouse. According to a report released last week from insurer Hiscox, the 95-year-old was the highest-grossing contemporary artist last year.

Yayoi Kusama was the world’s top-selling artist last year – The Japan Times

S2. Bullet train interests in the USA.

President Joe Biden is seeking to revive interest in a plan to build the first high-speed rail in the U. S. using Japanese bullet trains, with sources saying he is likely to discuss the project with Japan’s prime minister in Washington this week. Despite is Automobile legacy the total absence of this mode of brisk transportation in America is a bit amusing.

Exclusive: Biden and Kishida likely to discuss Texas bullet train project | Reuters

S3. Can we trust the polls? How emerging technologies affect democracy.

Do technologies change how democracy works, or do democratic principles determine how technologies work? With 2024 being a global election year — voters having gone to or set to head to polls in more than 60 countries — a great deal of attention is being paid to the relationship between emerging technologies and democracy.

Can we trust the polls? How emerging technologies affect democracy – The Japan Times

Wacky : amusing, peculiar

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Arresting  |  Factual  |  General  |  Seminal  |  Wacky

Select Articles from Reuters.

W1. Brazil’s Pix payments are killing cash. Are credit cards next?

W2. Russian military intelligence unit may be linked to ‘Havana syndrome’, Insider reports.

W3. Meet the Ukrainian amputees returning to the front to resist Russian advance.

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W1. Brazil’s Pix payments are killing cash. Are credit cards next?

In just three years, Brazil’s hugely popular Pix payment system has become the country’s favorite way to pay, replacing cash and wire transfers in many cases and now threatening the dominance of credit cards in the booming e-commerce sector.

Brazil’s Pix payments are killing cash. Are credit cards next? | Reuters

W2. Russian military intelligence unit may be linked to ‘Havana syndrome’, Insider reports.

The mysterious “Havana syndrome” ailment that has afflicted U.S. diplomats and spies across the world may be linked to energy weapons wielded by members of a Russian military intelligence sabotage unit, the Insider media group reported.

Russian military intelligence unit may be linked to ‘Havana syndrome’, Insider reports | Reuters

W3. Meet the Ukrainian amputees returning to the front to resist Russian advance.

Battlefields are littered with mines, while artillery and drone attacks are a constant menace, meaning the grim number is rising steadily. Reuters interviewed 20 military amputees for this article, seven of whom had returned to the army or intended to do so. For many of those able to do so, the desire to support their beleaguered comrades on the battlefield remains strong. There are gut-wrenching illustrations of the tragedy of this human atrocity- War.

Meet the Ukrainian amputees returning to the front to resist Russian advance | Reuters

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